Arquivo

Posts Tagged ‘Real Estate’

Today’s Best Investment ? Buy a house

February 9, 2011 How to Beat the Looming Inflation Tsunami

How to Beat the Looming Inflation Tsunami

[Editor’s Note: He predicted the financial crisis and the bull markets in gold and silver, and he “called” the bear-market bottom. Now Money Morning’s Martin Hutchinson is sounding the inflation alarm – and has identified the one move investors can make to beat the looming inflation tsunami.]

By Martin Hutchinson, Contributing Editor, Money Morning

Inflation is coming our way. Make no mistake about it.

This insidious increase in the general level of prices is currently rattling around in the world’s emerging markets – causing China and Brazil to put up interest rates and India to try and suppress it with price controls. It’s beginning to appear in Britain, which had a similar crash to the United States, but where the currency has been somewhat weaker.

Within the next six months – while the U.S. Federal Reserve is still buying U.S. Treasury bonds under its “quantitative easing” policy – this inflation tsunami will hit the United States.

Inflation is a lot like the unwelcome houseguest: Once you invite it into your home, you can’t seem to get it to leave.

The key catalysts for the inflationary visitor that’s headed our way are the silly-money policies that the Fed and other central banks have been pursuing. Those policies have inflated yet another massive bubble – this one in the commodities sector. All the cheap money that’s right now sloshing around the global markets have sent commodity prices into the stratosphere, and are causing emerging-market economies to grow like crazy.

Inflation was especially virulent in the 1970s, when rising prices and high unemployment combined to cause the particularly odious form known as “stagflation.” It certainly didn’t help that it took policymakers almost the entire decade to face up to the fact that inflation wouldn’t go away on its own.

Indeed, it wasn’t until we got Paul A. Volcker in as Fed chairman in 1979 that inflation even had a worthy foe. It was Volcker who eventually crafted the aggressive policies that were required to vanquish the inflationary pressures that had gripped the U.S. economy for so long.

This time around, unfortunately, the U.S. central bank appears to be even more determined to ignore inflation’s early warning signs, while the banks and the politicians will fiercely resist higher interest rates, the only known remedy, because of the dangers of a further housing collapse.

So we can expect inflation to be with us for several years this time, too. In fact, expect it to get worse for the next three to four years, while Ben S. Bernanke remains at the helm of the nation’s central bank. Bernanke’s term as Fed chairman ends in January 2014; hopefully, whoever is the U.S. president at that point won’t reappoint him.

But we’d better arrange matters so we don’t lose out from it.

A Tale of Caution

As investors, the main problem we have with inflation is that any contract written in nominal dollars will rapidly decline in value. Long-term bonds are the classic losers from periods of inflation; their nominal value declines, and their prices decline, as well, because inflation pushes up interest rates.

My Great-aunt Nan, a splendid lady, retired at 65 in 1947 – at the beginning of Britain’s postwar inflationary surge, with ample retirement savings – invested in a 3.5% War Loan, the normal safe haven for British savers in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

She made it into the 1970s, bless her. But by the time she died, not only was the income from her War Loan worth a quarter of its 1947 value, but its capital value had also declined in nominal terms to about 30% of its 1947 level, as interest rates had risen from 3½% to 12%.

(Little wonder the British newspaper, The Independent, once wrote that “over the years … the War Loan is a monument to the poor investment value of government stocks.”)

Don’t let this happen to you!

The One Move to Make Now

If your money is in bonds – whether those bonds are U.S. Treasuries, municipals or corporates – move it somewhere else.

If you have the sort of solid final-service pension that companies used to give out and the government still does, check the inflation protection. If the pension doesn’t have a 100% protection against inflation – however high it goes – you have a problem.

In the face of rampant inflation, many stocks won’t be an answer, either. Theoretically, if your company is making tangible things from tangible factories, or providing tangible services (and not just sitting on a bunch of loans and bonds), then its earnings (and therefore its overall value) should rise with prices. In practice, however, this often doesn’t happen.

For one thing, many institutional investors use the so-called “Fed Rule” for determining share price values, which divides the expected future earnings stream by the current interest rate (Future Earnings Stream/Current Interest Rates = Share Price Value).

That’s why stocks behaved so spectacularly in 1982-2000: As interest rates came down the “denominator” of that value equation got smaller and smaller – which made it easy for the share price value to go up.

But there’s a problem: That formula uses “nominal” – not “real” – interest rates. It also fails to account for cuckoo Fed policies, so if interest rates are exceptionally low for a long period, the formula says share prices should go up and up. And if the interest rate is close to zero, the share “value” should be close to infinity!

With the return of inflation, nominal rates will have to increase to keep pace. And real interest rates will have to do the same as Volcker-esque monetary policies are used to get inflation under control. So share prices will almost certainly decline sharply in real terms, just as they did from 1966-82, even though nominal share prices remained approximately flat.

Gold and silver are a good speculation in times of inflation, but not a good investment. Before 1914, when the world was on the “gold standard,” the gold market was approximately in equilibrium at a price of just under $19 per ounce. U.S. consumer prices have increased 22-fold since then, so a price of $418 per ounce today would be fully justified. You see the problem?

In practice, the increase in world population – by about 3.7 times – since 1914 should have caused the gold price to increase approximately in tandem. That’s because the world’s gold supplies have not increased, but its population has. That would justify a price of around $1,550 today.

This calculation suggests gold is a good buy currently, but if inflation returns and money stays cheap, the price of gold is going to be far above that level quite soon, and buying gold will have become a very speculative activity. At $3,000 per ounce, gold is a hugely risky investment.

What’s the best investment to make right now? A house.

The housing market has bottomed out – or, at worst, is close to doing so. And you can get a fabulous rate on a 30-year mortgage, making you benefit from inflation just as bondholders lose from it.

The combination of a relatively depressed housing market and cheap money is uniquely favorable, so you should take advantage of it. For the best investment, you can narrow the recommendation further:

  • Don’t buy around Washington: The market has been pushed up by the flood of bureaucrats and lobbyists that have taken up residence inside the Beltway – an influx that will reverse itself as the U.S. budget is finally brought under control.
  • Don’t buy in Manhattan or the Hamptons: Prices have been pushed up by all the silly money sloshing about in financial services, which will disappear with higher interest rates.
  • Don’t buy in Silicon Valley: That advice holds true there, and anywhere else where local wealth has been inflated by stock options.
  • Do buy in a medium-sized town: Make sure that town is in an area where the economy is not dependent on finance, the government or energy/commodities.
  • Do buy an old house, instead of a new house: Buy an old rather than a new house – the supply of old houses is fixed, whereas new McMansions will appear in profusion and flood the market while interest rates remain low (developers all have large land banks they want to develop.)
  • Do take a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage: In a time of inflation and low interest rates, a long-term, fixed-rate mortgage is a gift from above.
  • Don’t overextend yourself financially: There could be big recessions in the next few years, so you need to be able to make the payments without selling the house.
  • Do be prepared to rent, rather than sell: If you have to move in the next few years, become a landlord and rent the house out instead of selling it outright. Rents have been pretty well flat in the last 10 years; they are likely to beat inflation in the next 10 years, since higher interest rates tend to push rents higher.

Readers often wonder if we follow our own advice. Money Morning has a very good rule, which says that I should not deal in any stocks that I recommend to you. But in this case, I’m happy to be able to report that I am practicing what I preach – I’m taking advantage of the current climate to relocate … and am in the process of buying a house!

[Editor’s Note: If investors have to now worry about the “I-word” – inflation – they’re also going to have to worry about the “R-word” – retirement.

Here’s the problem: The longer you work, the more you can save – and the longer the rampant inflation we’re expecting will have to work on your nest egg.

But here’s the solution: Boost your rates of return.

That’s actually just as easy as it sounds. You just have to have the right strategy – and the right investments. And as a subscriber to The Money Map Report, our monthly affiliate, you can count on getting both. Find out by clicking here to read a report that details this strategy.]

February 9, 2011

How to Beat the Looming Inflation Tsunami

How to Beat the Looming Inflation Tsunami

[Editor’s Note: He predicted the financial crisis and the bull markets in gold and silver, and he “called” the bear-market bottom. Now Money Morning’s Martin Hutchinson is sounding the inflation alarm – and has identified the one move investors can make to beat the looming inflation tsunami.]

Inflation is coming our way. Make no mistake about it.

This insidious increase in the general level of prices is currently rattling around in the world’s emerging markets – causing China and Brazil to put up interest rates and India to try and suppress it with price controls. It’s beginning to appear in Britain, which had a similar crash to the United States, but where the currency has been somewhat weaker.

Within the next six months – while the U.S. Federal Reserve is still buying U.S. Treasury bonds under its “quantitative easing” policy – this inflation tsunami will hit the United States.

Inflation is a lot like the unwelcome houseguest: Once you invite it into your home, you can’t seem to get it to leave.

The key catalysts for the inflationary visitor that’s headed our way are the silly-money policies that the Fed and other central banks have been pursuing. Those policies have inflated yet another massive bubble – this one in the commodities sector. All the cheap money that’s right now sloshing around the global markets have sent commodity prices into the stratosphere, and are causing emerging-market economies to grow like crazy.

Inflation was especially virulent in the 1970s, when rising prices and high unemployment combined to cause the particularly odious form known as “stagflation.” It certainly didn’t help that it took policymakers almost the entire decade to face up to the fact that inflation wouldn’t go away on its own.

Indeed, it wasn’t until we got Paul A. Volcker in as Fed chairman in 1979 that inflation even had a worthy foe. It was Volcker who eventually crafted the aggressive policies that were required to vanquish the inflationary pressures that had gripped the U.S. economy for so long.

This time around, unfortunately, the U.S. central bank appears to be even more determined to ignore inflation’s early warning signs, while the banks and the politicians will fiercely resist higher interest rates, the only known remedy, because of the dangers of a further housing collapse.

So we can expect inflation to be with us for several years this time, too. In fact, expect it to get worse for the next three to four years, while Ben S. Bernanke remains at the helm of the nation’s central bank. Bernanke’s term as Fed chairman ends in January 2014; hopefully, whoever is the U.S. president at that point won’t reappoint him.

But we’d better arrange matters so we don’t lose out from it.

A Tale of Caution

As investors, the main problem we have with inflation is that any contract written in nominal dollars will rapidly decline in value. Long-term bonds are the classic losers from periods of inflation; their nominal value declines, and their prices decline, as well, because inflation pushes up interest rates.

My Great-aunt Nan, a splendid lady, retired at 65 in 1947 – at the beginning of Britain’s postwar inflationary surge, with ample retirement savings – invested in a 3.5% War Loan, the normal safe haven for British savers in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

She made it into the 1970s, bless her. But by the time she died, not only was the income from her War Loan worth a quarter of its 1947 value, but its capital value had also declined in nominal terms to about 30% of its 1947 level, as interest rates had risen from 3½% to 12%.

(Little wonder the British newspaper, The Independent, once wrote that “over the years … the War Loan is a monument to the poor investment value of government stocks.”)

Don’t let this happen to you!

The One Move to Make Now

If your money is in bonds – whether those bonds are U.S. Treasuries, municipals or corporates – move it somewhere else.

If you have the sort of solid final-service pension that companies used to give out and the government still does, check the inflation protection. If the pension doesn’t have a 100% protection against inflation – however high it goes – you have a problem.

In the face of rampant inflation, many stocks won’t be an answer, either. Theoretically, if your company is making tangible things from tangible factories, or providing tangible services (and not just sitting on a bunch of loans and bonds), then its earnings (and therefore its overall value) should rise with prices. In practice, however, this often doesn’t happen.

For one thing, many institutional investors use the so-called “Fed Rule” for determining share price values, which divides the expected future earnings stream by the current interest rate (Future Earnings Stream/Current Interest Rates = Share Price Value).

That’s why stocks behaved so spectacularly in 1982-2000: As interest rates came down the “denominator” of that value equation got smaller and smaller – which made it easy for the share price value to go up.

But there’s a problem: That formula uses “nominal” – not “real” – interest rates. It also fails to account for cuckoo Fed policies, so if interest rates are exceptionally low for a long period, the formula says share prices should go up and up. And if the interest rate is close to zero, the share “value” should be close to infinity!

With the return of inflation, nominal rates will have to increase to keep pace. And real interest rates will have to do the same as Volcker-esque monetary policies are used to get inflation under control. So share prices will almost certainly decline sharply in real terms, just as they did from 1966-82, even though nominal share prices remained approximately flat.

Gold and silver are a good speculation in times of inflation, but not a good investment. Before 1914, when the world was on the “gold standard,” the gold market was approximately in equilibrium at a price of just under $19 per ounce. U.S. consumer prices have increased 22-fold since then, so a price of $418 per ounce today would be fully justified. You see the problem?

In practice, the increase in world population – by about 3.7 times – since 1914 should have caused the gold price to increase approximately in tandem. That’s because the world’s gold supplies have not increased, but its population has. That would justify a price of around $1,550 today.

This calculation suggests gold is a good buy currently, but if inflation returns and money stays cheap, the price of gold is going to be far above that level quite soon, and buying gold will have become a very speculative activity. At $3,000 per ounce, gold is a hugely risky investment.

What’s the best investment to make right now? A house.

The housing market has bottomed out – or, at worst, is close to doing so. And you can get a fabulous rate on a 30-year mortgage, making you benefit from inflation just as bondholders lose from it.

The combination of a relatively depressed housing market and cheap money is uniquely favorable, so you should take advantage of it. For the best investment, you can narrow the recommendation further:

  • Don’t buy around Washington: The market has been pushed up by the flood of bureaucrats and lobbyists that have taken up residence inside the Beltway – an influx that will reverse itself as the U.S. budget is finally brought under control.
  • Don’t buy in Manhattan or the Hamptons: Prices have been pushed up by all the silly money sloshing about in financial services, which will disappear with higher interest rates.
  • Don’t buy in Silicon Valley: That advice holds true there, and anywhere else where local wealth has been inflated by stock options.
  • Do buy in a medium-sized town: Make sure that town is in an area where the economy is not dependent on finance, the government or energy/commodities.
  • Do buy an old house, instead of a new house: Buy an old rather than a new house – the supply of old houses is fixed, whereas new McMansions will appear in profusion and flood the market while interest rates remain low (developers all have large land banks they want to develop.)
  • Do take a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage: In a time of inflation and low interest rates, a long-term, fixed-rate mortgage is a gift from above.
  • Don’t overextend yourself financially: There could be big recessions in the next few years, so you need to be able to make the payments without selling the house.
  • Do be prepared to rent, rather than sell: If you have to move in the next few years, become a landlord and rent the house out instead of selling it outright. Rents have been pretty well flat in the last 10 years; they are likely to beat inflation in the next 10 years, since higher interest rates tend to push rents higher.

Readers often wonder if we follow our own advice. Money Morning has a very good rule, which says that I should not deal in any stocks that I recommend to you. But in this case, I’m happy to be able to report that I am practicing what I preach – I’m taking advantage of the current climate to relocate … and am in the process of buying a house!

[Editor’s Note: If investors have to now worry about the “I-word” – inflation – they’re also going to have to worry about the “R-word” – retirement.

Here’s the problem: The longer you work, the more you can save – and the longer the rampant inflation we’re expecting will have to work on your nest egg.

But here’s the solution: Boost your rates of return.

That’s actually just as easy as it sounds. You just have to have the right strategy – and the right investments. And as a subscriber to The Money Map Report, our monthly affiliate, you can count on getting both. Find out by clicking here to read a report that details this strategy.]

Anúncios

PDG Realty amplia atuação e entra no mercado hoteleiro

PDG Realty amplia atuação e entra no mercado hoteleiro
Daniela D’Ambrosio | Valor

17/11/2010 8:21.

SÃO PAULO – A PDG Realty, a maior incorporadora do país após a compra da Agre, vai entrar no mercado hoteleiro. A empresa, que atuará como incorporadora e construtora, assinou ontem um memorando de entendimentos com o grupo Marriott, uma das três maiores redes de hotéis do mundo, para o desenvolvimento de 50 hotéis econômicos no país nos próximos cinco anos. A parceria marca a entrada da bandeira Fairfield no Brasil.

A Fairfield, muito presente no mercado americano, é a mais econômica entre as 18 marcas que a Marriott opera, que tem em seu portfólio Renaissance Ritz-Carlton e Bulgari. A comparação mais direta com Fairfield – embora a empresa não a faça – é a marca Ibis, da concorrente Accor. Os quartos têm cerca de 20 metros quadrados e a diária deve girar em torno de R$ 160. Ao todo, existem 630 hotéis com a bandeira no mundo. O acordo prevê preferência de ambas as partes na operação e construção de hotéis no país. Os primeiros hotéis serão lançados já em 2011.

A gestão e operação dos hotéis ficará à cargo da rede Marriott, que também será a responsável por apresentar à PDG Realty os investidores interessados no mercado hoteleiro brasileiro. “Para cada terreno, haverá um estudo de viabilidade e implantação, que será apresentado aos investidores”, afirma Ricardo Setton que será o responsável pela nova divisão dentro da PDG Realty. Setton é um dos fundadores e ex-sócios da Agre, que chegou a construir 28 hotéis de diferentes bandeiras. “Como incorporadores, nós saímos com a garantia de termos o negócio 100% vendido”, afirma Setton. A PDG entrega o hotel pronto, inclusive, com todo o mobiliário.

Os investidores são, na maioria, fundos soberanos, que têm perfil de longo prazo e já investem com a Marriott em várias partes do mundo. O próprio hotel pode entrar como investidor em alguns fundos ou tornar-se proprietário de alguns hotéis. “Há vários investidores, proprietários de hotéis nossos em outras partes do mundo interessados em investir no Brasil”, diz Guilherme Cesari, vice-presidente de desenvolvimento do grupo Marriott no Brasil, contratado no início do ano para promover a expansão do grupo no país. “Além dos fatores macroeconômicos, o crescimento das cidades médias, a Copa do Mundo e a Olimpíada (de 2016) atraem os estrangeiros para o segmento hoteleiro no país”, diz Michel Wurman, diretor financeiro e de relações com investidores da PDG Realty.

Segundo Cesari, a vantagem em fechar a parceria com a PDG Realty está no banco de terrenos e na presença geográfica da companhia em todo o Brasil. O potencial de construção do banco de terrenos da PDG Realty é de R$ 31 bilhões. A companhia está em 25 cidades brasileiras.

Atualmente, a rede Marriott possui apenas quatro hotéis no Brasil, onde está há 13 anos – está bem distante de concorrentes como o grupo francês Accor e a recém-criada Allia Hotels, que reúne as bandeiras Bristol, Plaza Inn e Solare, com 40 hotéis em operação. Um deles fica próximo Aeroporto Internacional de Guarulhos (franquia), o Renaissance, nos Jardins, em São Paulo; Marriott Executive Apartment, na Vila Nova Conceição, também em São Paulo; e JW Marriott, na Praia de Copacabana, que há cerca de um mês foi vendido a um fundo americano.

Há quatro anos, o grupo Marriott começou a investir na China e na Índia, países que já possuem cerca de 70 bandeiras da marca. “Faltava o Brasil nessa estratégia de expansão internacional” afirma Cesari. No Brasil, a demanda por hotéis econômicos cresceu bastante nos últimos anos. Ao contrário dos resorts e hotéis mais luxuosos, têm escala. “Oferecem maior oportunidade de crescimento com baixo risco e boa rentabilidade para o investidor”, diz o executivo do Marriott.

(Daniela D’Ambrosio | Valor)

.

Atrasada, Brookfield revê estratégia e ganho sobe

Atrasada, Brookfield revê estratégia e ganho sobe
De São Paulo
12/11/2010

A Brookfield está no grupo das grandes pelo volume de lançamentos e vendas, mas sempre ficou aquém nos resultados financeiros. Nos últimos trimestres, porém, a companhia tem conseguido tirar a desvantagem que tinha em relação a outras construtoras e incorporadoras, embora ainda mantenha algumas métricas abaixo da média de mercado.

“Estamos atrasados em relação aos nossos pares”, reconhece Nicholas Reade, presidente da companhia. “Não crescemos tanto quanto os concorrentes nos anos de 2007 e 2008”, diz.

Por conta dessa defasagem, a companhia adotou uma série de medidas. Segundo Reade, além do controle das despesas – as despesas de vendas e marketing, como percentual da receita líquida, passaram de 5,6% no terceiro trimestre de 2009 para 4,8% no terceiro trimestre de 2010 -, a empresa está vendendo ativos e buscando sócios financeiros em projetos.

A empresa vendeu para a Veremonte Real Estate um terreno onde fica a antiga sede do BCN. “Era um projeto de longa maturação e queremos antecipar resultados”, diz. Paralelamente, está aumentando a exposição à baixa renda, cujos giro e, consequentemente, retorno são mais rápidos.

O lucro líquido atingiu R$ 80,8 milhões no terceiro trimestre de 2010, um aumento de 46,9% quando comparado com o mesmo período de 2009. Nos primeiros nove meses do ano, o lucro líquido atingiu R$ 266 milhões, o que representa 131% do lucro líquido de todo o ano passado. A margem líquida foi de 12,9%, ainda abaixo da média de mercado do setor no primeiro semestre, de 15%.

Segundo Reade, um dos indicadores que mostra a recuperação dos resultados é que vendas contratadas e receita estão praticamente no mesmo nível – R$ 2,6 bilhões em vendas para R$ 2,3 bilhões em receita, o que não acontecia no ano passado. A velocidade de vendas, de 15%, ainda está abaixo da média do mercado. As vendas de residenciais foram de R$ 730 milhões no trimestre para uma média de R$ 470 milhões nos dois primeiros trimestres do ano. (DD)

.

Financiamento de imóveis bate recorde

Perspectivas: Demanda deve continuar firme em 2011, porque consumidores estão dispostos a se endividar

Financiamento de imóveis bate recorde

Roberto Rockmann | Para o Valor, de São Paulo

11/11/2010

Leonardo Rodrigues/Valor

Cláudio Borges, do Bradesco: a expansão do crédito imobiliário está ocorrendo em todas as regiões do Brasil

Diante do forte crescimento da economia, juros em queda e perspectivas positivas para os próximos anos, o ritmo de concessão de crédito imobiliário nos bancos privados e estatais tem crescido com força neste ano e batido recordes. O movimento não deverá parar por aí: em 2011, os bancos vão continuar buscando oferecer mais financiamento para as pessoas adquirirem imóveis.

"A disposição das pessoas físicas em aumentar seus níveis de endividamento continua elevada, diante da confiança em alta dos consumidores e as boas perspectivas do mercado de trabalho. O crédito imobiliário deverá continuar se destacando e crescendo no mesmo ritmo atual, pelo menos até o primeiro trimestre de 2011, horizonte medido pelo nosso indicador", afirma o gerente de indicadores de mercado da Serasa Experian, Luiz Rabi. "Diferentemente de outras modalidades, como o cartão de crédito, o financiamento imobiliário trabalha com prazos muito longos, de até 30 anos, e juros relativamente baixos, de 12% ao ano. Esses são pontos que contribuem para estimular sua expansão futura", comenta Rabi.

Principal agente financiador da construção civil no Brasil, a Caixa Econômica Federal (CEF) tem batido recordes sucessivos nos últimos anos. Em 2010, não será diferente. O crédito imobiliário deverá chegar a R$ 70 bilhões neste ano – cerca de 50% superior ao resultado de 2009 e 14 vezes maior que os R$ 5 bilhões financiados em 2003. Parte do bom resultado se deve à criação do programa Minha Casa, Minha Vida, destinado a famílias de menor poder aquisitivo. Até o fim de outubro, a Caixa havia contratado 712.902 unidades habitacionais, no valor de R$ 40,1 bilhões, no programa.

Em setembro, a média diária de financiamento de imóveis na Caixa chegou a 5.340 contratos. A expectativa é de que, nos meses de novembro e dezembro, se mantenha acima de 5 mil contratos por dia. As perspectivas para 2011 também são positivas, com possibilidade de expansão de até 20%.

O otimismo do banco estatal é compartilhado por instituições privadas e se deve a dois fatores: o Brasil convive com um déficit habitacional de aproximadamente 7 milhões de unidades residenciais, e a penetração do crédito imobiliário na economia brasileira ainda é baixa. Cerca de 90% do déficit de residências no país está concentrado nas famílias que recebem abaixo de cinco salários mínimos mensais, 7% nas famílias que recebem entre cinco e dez salários mínimos e o restante nas famílias ganha acima de dez salários mínimos.

Segundo estimativas do Bradesco, se somado o crédito a financiamento e construção de imóveis, o financiamento ao setor imobiliário deve chegar a 3,9% do PIB neste ano, bem acima dos 2,1% apurados em 2008 e dos 2,9% de 2009. Em 2014, o número deverá saltar para 14,7%. "O ritmo de concessão está em forte crescimento em todas as regiões do Brasil e as perspectivas são muito positivas", diz o diretor da área imobiliária, Cláudio Borges. De janeiro a setembro, a contratação chegaram a R$ 6,8 bilhões, 25% a mais do que no mesmo período de 2009.

Para 2011, Borges também acredita que a demanda por crédito imobiliário deverá permanecer em patamares elevados e crescer bem acima dos dois dígitos. "As classes C e D começaram a ingressar com mais força no financiamento", diz Borges. No Bradesco, cerca de um terço do dinheiro concedido a pessoas físicas para compra de imóveis tem sido direcionado a quem recebe entre três a dez salários mínimos. Em 2010, cerca de 20% dos imóveis financiados têm valores de aquisição entre R$ 100 mil e R$ 150 mil. NO ano passado, 13% dos imóveis adquiridos estavam nessa faixa de preço.

No Itaú Unibanco, a carteira de crédito imobiliário também cresce. De janeiro a setembro, atingiu R$ 12 bilhões, alta de 13,9% no trimestre e de 52,7% ante o mesmo período do ano anterior. Do total, cerca de R$ 7 bilhões se referem a operações com pessoas físicas e R$ 5 bilhões em dinheiro financiado a incorporadoras e construtoras. Apesar do crescimento, o segmento representa cerca de 4% da carteira do maior banco privado do país, um percentual que não está muito longe do verificado em outras instituições financeiras privadas. Estimativas de mercado apontam que entre 5% a 7% das carteiras dos bancos privados no Brasil estão direcionadas a imóveis, um número baixo quando comparado a outros bancos no exterior.

Na Europa, cerca de metade da carteira dos bancos está ligada a hipotecas. "Na operação global do Santander, as hipotecas chegam a responder por 50% da carteira do banco, o que mostra o potencial que o segmento representa no Brasil", diz o diretor de negócios imobiliários, José Roberto Machado. Entre janeiro e setembro, a filial brasileira do banco espanhol registrou carteira de R$ 11,7 bilhões, sendo que 60% estão relacionados a operações com pessoas físicas e 40% com incorporadoras e construtoras. "Temos visto uma penetração desse produto em todos os segmentos, da renda mais baixa à mais elevada", analisa Machado.

Com a economia estável e inflação sob controle, as pessoas de baixa renda têm trocado o aluguel por parcelas da aquisição do primeiro imóvel. Na média renda, os reajustes salariais acima da inflação e o aumento do preço dos imóveis têm feito com que muitos financiem a compra de um imóvel melhor e maior que o antigo. No topo da pirâmide, os consumidores de alta renda investem em residências de olho na remuneração do aluguel, uma forma de ampliar o portfólio de investimentos.

Nos últimos meses, uma dúvida tem surgido entre os analistas: o crescimento da concessão de crédito imobiliário no Brasil está sendo sustentável? No caso especifico de financiamento imobiliário, além de avaliar a renda disponível do cliente, os bancos buscam fazer com que a prestação não comprometa além de 30% da renda de quem toma o empréstimo. Na Caixa e no Bradesco, na média, quem tem acesso aos recursos utiliza cerca de 20% da renda para adquirir um imóvel.

BrasilBrokers fecha acordo de exclusividade com HSBC

BrasilBrokers fecha acordo de exclusividade com HSBC

Adriana Cotias | Valor
15/10/2010 7:34

SÃO PAULO – O HSBC fechou contrato de cinco anos, renováveis por mais cinco, com a BrasilBrokers, para ter exclusividade na oferta de crédito à habitação aos compradores que fizerem negócio com as 22 empresas imobiliárias que compõem o grupo. A previsão é que a parceria gere contratos de R$ 10 bilhões para a subsidiária do banco inglês no Brasil, que vai fechar o ano com uma carteira de R$ 1,5 bilhão. O negócio encontra algum paralelo no acordo selado pelo Itaú com a corretora Lopes, em 2007, na CrediPronto, com a diferença de que não haverá uma estrutura societária e a Brasil Brokers será remunerada por performance, sem divisão de resultados.

Pelo modelo desenhado, a estimativa é de que, para a BrasilBrokers, a aliança proporcione receitas adicionais de R$ 160 milhões nos primeiros cinco anos e R$ 420 milhões no período completo do contrato. Não é de hoje que a consultoria buscava um parceiro financeiro para acelerar a sua expansão. Desde que a Lopes se aproximou do Itaú, recebendo pelo acordo R$ 290 milhões à vista, com perspectiva de embolsar mais R$ 220 milhões atrelados a resultados em dez anos, a BrasilBrokers estudava caminho semelhante. Os bancos também vinham assediando a empresa.

A Brasil Brokers não vai receber um pagamento “na frente” para franquear seus balcões de negócios, como fez a Lopes. Em vez disso, negociou comissões maiores e um adiantamento de R$ 45 milhões em comissões, segundo o presidente da empresa, Sergio Newlands Freire.

A parceria prevê que 80% dos recursos sejam desembolsados pelo HSBC em 2011, servindo ao propósito de financiar a expansão orgânica e aquisições planejadas pela BrasilBrokers, especialmente em São Paulo, onde a empresa tem participação pequena, de menos de 1% do mercado, conta Freire.

Antes do desfecho com o HSBC, o grupo chegou a conversar com Banco do Brasil, Caixa, Bradescoe Real, diálogo iniciado na fase anterior à aquisição pelo Santander. A crise em 2008 interrompeu o projeto e foi no fim de 2009 que os telefones voltaram a tocar, conta Freire. De acordo com o executivo, foi a proposta do HSBC que melhor se enquadrou ao que a companhia almejava como retorno e estrutura de negócio. O banco vai destacar equipes das áreas de vendas, crédito, processos e contratos só para atender a BrasilBrokers. Vai também treinar os 13 mil corretores da empresa para fazer a oferta do financiamento, casada com a transação imobiliária.

O HSBC terá exclusividade de ser o primeiro a fazer a análise de crédito aos clientes da empresa e promete a liberação dos recursos em até 30 dias. Para o banco, a parceria representa um atalho para crescer no crédito imobiliário, segmento em que tem participação relativa pequena se comparada ao tamanho do grupo inglês nessa área, diz o diretor Antonio Barbosa. No país, a carteira de R$ 1,5 bilhão representa apenas 6% do conjunto de ativos, enquanto globalmente a fatia chega a 28% dos US$ 261 bilhões totais. Com o acordo, a produção anual, que neste ano chegará a R$ 1 bilhão no portfólio de pessoa física, dobra de tamanho já em 2011, com um terço advindo das operações com a BrasilBrokers. O banco vai se valer da distribuição nacional da consultoria imobiliária para ganhar relevância em mercados em que teria presença “invisível”, destaca Barbosa.

O assédio dos bancos às consultorias de imóveis se explica pelo forte potencial de expansão do crédito imobiliário no Brasil, que já cresce a uma velocidade de 50% ao ano, mas ainda representa menos de 4% do PIB, parcela incipiente quando comparada a outros mercados na própria América Latina – 17% no Chile e 12% no México, por exemplo. “O brasileiro compra, em média, 1,2 casa por vida, enquanto o americano compra 2,8 casas. E só metade das unidades vendidas no Brasil são financiadas”, diz Barbosa.

Freire, da BrasilBrokers, adianta que a parceria não para por aí. Qualquer negócio que envolva um “pool” de instituições financeiras terá o banco como participante: cobrança, folha de pagamento ou qualquer captação podem entrar no pacote. Uma oferta subsequente de ações em 2011 é um dos planos em estudo para dar vazão ao projeto de crescimento do grupo.

(Adriana Cotias | Valor)

Jovens, ambiciosos e com muita pressa

Jovens, ambiciosos e com muita pressa

Graças à cultura herdada do Banco Pactual, a PDG virou a maior incorporadora do País

Naiana Oscar – O Estado de S.Paulo

Num andar baixo de um edifício na Praia de Botafogo, no Rio de Janeiro, com vista para a alça de acesso de um viaduto, está o centro nervoso da maior incorporadora imobiliária do País, a PDG Realty – empresa que, no primeiro semestre deste ano, desbancou a liderança de mais de uma década da Cyrela. É a sede de uma gigante que chegou ao topo em sete anos, seguindo a cartilha dos bancos de investimento: equipe jovem, salários fixos baixos, bônus milionários e pressa, muita pressa – porque, como gostam de repetir seus executivos, “dinheiro custa no tempo”.

Dali, eles controlam as finanças da Goldfarb, da CHL e, de quatro meses para cá, da Agre. Além disso, a PDG tem participação minoritária em cinco empresas do ramo. No escritório da holding, os 32 funcionários – a metade, mulheres – têm em média 27 anos de idade. São recém-formados em faculdades de administração e economia, que vão trabalhar com mochilas nas costas, varam madrugadas, fins de semana e fazem plantão até nas férias, por um salário muito abaixo do mercado – a média é R$ 4 mil. Mas que pode ser multiplicado indefinidamente no fim do ano se as metas forem cumpridas. No ano passado, a empresa distribuiu R$ 28 milhões em bônus – ou 7% do seu lucro.

O mais velho no escritório é o presidente, José Grabowsky, de 47 anos, o Zeca, um dos executivos mais bem-remunerados do País. Despojado, dispensa terno e gravata, não tem sala nem secretária, trabalha num ambiente sem divisórias, uma informalidade herdada do antigo banco Pactual, onde nasceu a PDG.

Zeca e o inseparável Michel Wurman, diretor financeiro da incorporadora, já trabalhavam juntos no banco de investimentos de André Esteves e Gilberto Sayão. Sem nunca terem assentado um tijolo, os dois passaram a responder pelos investimentos imobiliários do banco e começaram a aplicar o “senso de urgência” de uma instituição financeira na construção civil. “O banco é medido por semestre e não podíamos, por exemplo, esperar a valorização de um terreno para gerar resultado”, explica Zeca. “Era do prato para a boca.”

Agressividade. Até 2006, apenas a Cyrela tinha faturamento acima de R$ 1 bilhão entre as empresas imobiliárias no Brasil. Foi naquele ano que a PDG entrou em cena com uma estratégia agressiva de crescimento por meio de aquisições, mas ainda como um jogador inofensivo. A incorporadora comprou participações na carioca CHL e nas paulistas Lindencorp e Goldfarb, que atua no segmento de baixa renda. Na época, a Goldfarb lançava 2,5 mil imóveis por ano. Em 2010, deve chegar aos 25 mil – um crescimento de 900% em quatro anos.

Ao comprar uma empresa, a PDG costuma seguir um esquema padrão: de imediato, “ocupa” o departamento financeiro da companhia com profissionais de confiança e conhecedores da doutrina. Já nos primeiros meses, é preciso ajustar salários para enquadrar a empresa nas regras de meritocracia e fazer com que os novos funcionários também sejam movidos a bônus. A operação imobiliária segue nas mãos de quem entende. E disso os antigos donos não costumam reclamar. “Tenho autonomia para tomar decisões, estou focado em construir e não preciso me preocupar com fluxo de caixa, capitalização, relacionamento com investidores”, diz Milton Goldfarb, fundador da Goldfarb.

Os empresários ganham liberdade. Menos para descumprir as metas. “Tenho a impressão de que vou ser enforcado em praça pública se não atingir os objetivos”, brinca Rogério Chor, fundador da incorporadora carioca CHL, a segunda a ter o controle adquirido pela PDG. Uma vez por semana, ele se reúne com Zeca e Michel para mantê-los informados sobre os principais números da empresa. “E eles não querem ouvir historinha, saber se a semana foi boa ou complicada. Eles querem resultado.”

Para este ano, os “banqueiros” da PDG exigiram inicialmente um volume de vendas de R$ 730 milhões da CHL, que atua apenas no Rio. Chor teve de gastar muita saliva para convencer a dupla de que o valor era inalcançável. Conseguiu baixar a meta para R$ 680 milhões, com lucro de R$ 120 milhões. “Ainda assim, achávamos impossível, mas já lucramos R$ 65 milhões no primeiro semestre”, diz o executivo.

Depois da CHL, a PDG passou um tempo negociando novas aquisições sem muito sucesso. A mais recente e inesperada cartada foi a compra da Agre, em maio deste ano. A companhia, que surgiu da união de Agra, Abyara e Klabin Segall, levou a PDG ao topo do ranking. Na última sexta-feira, a PDG fechou o dia valendo R$ 11 bilhões na Bolsa – 10,7% a mais que os R$ 9,9 bilhões da incorporadora de Elie Horn. A Cyrela diz não se importar com a segunda posição. “O que vale é sermos os melhores e não os maiores”, afirma Ubirajara Freitas, diretor geral da construtora.

No mercado, o que se ouve é diferente. Quem o conhece diz que Horn começou a se sentir ameaçado em 2008. A sensação teria piorado este ano, com a compra da Agre, do empresário Luiz Roberto Horst. Beto, como é conhecido, já foi sócio da Cyrela e era um dos nomes apontados para suceder Horn.

Estilo. A PDG encontrou a Agre em dificuldades e teve como primeira missão renegociar a dívida de R$ 1,3 bilhão. Em menos de 60 dias, o prazo foi estendido de 29 para 48 meses e as taxas, reduzidas. “Levaríamos pelo menos o dobro do tempo para chegar a esse resultado”, admite Beto.

O executivo diz que ainda está se habituando ao jeito PDG de tocar os negócios – muito mais “neurótico” e “urgente”. “Criaram uma cultura que nem eles sabem dizer direito o que é. Ela surgiu oralmente, praticada no dia a dia”, afirma. “O importante agora é colocar essa cultura no papel, para que ela possa ser transmitida para os mais novos e para que a empresa sobreviva à saída dos atuais líderes.”

Numa empresa com dono, as regras do jogo são definidas pelos próprios fundadores. Em janeiro deste ano, quando o fundo que administrava o dinheiro dos ex-sócios do Pactual vendeu sua participação ao mercado, a PDG tornou-se a única corporação do setor no País. A Vinci Partners, empresa de investimento de Gilberto Sayão, tem uma participação inferior a 5%. Menos de 2% das ações estão nas mãos de executivos e mais de 90% são negociadas no mercado.

O professor de Real Estate da Escola Politécnica da USP, João da Rocha Lima Jr., é simpático ao perfil nada personalista adotado pela PDG. “É uma postura amadora achar que um empreendimento se resolve por sensibilidade do empreendedor.” Para ele, sem a figura do dono e com uma origem diferente das concorrentes, a empresa cresceu sem alguns “defeitos” do setor, como o que leva controladores a se preocupar com questões menores da construção sem fazer uma leitura geral da empresa.

Desafios. O futuro da PDG ainda é uma incógnita para os concorrentes. Quem vê o negócio de fora diz que a operação é tocada por executivos com muita experiência no ramo, mas que devem ficar pouco tempo na incorporadora. Um executivo do setor acredita que, como os donos das empresas compradas ficaram muito ricos, vai chegar um momento em que a motivação deles pelo trabalho cairá, desestabilizando a companhia.

A PDG garante que está preparada para as futuras sucessões e diz que esse é um risco que afeta também as concorrentes, centralizadas na figura do fundador. “O fato é que tudo é muito recente e a PDG ainda não passou por um ciclo inteiro de comprar, pensar apartamentos, receber, vender e ter os clientes morando. A escola que eles criaram ainda está em teste”, diz um executivo.

Com Agre, PDG assume liderança do segmento

Com Agre, PDG assume liderança do segmento

Daniela D ‘ Ambrosio | Valor

17/08/2010 09:13

SÃO PAULO – Em seu primeiro balanço consolidado com Agre, a PDG Realty tirou a dúvida que ainda sobre a liderança do setor. Quando comparada à Cyrela – que, até a aquisição da Agre pela PDG era líder inconteste – a nova empresa assume a primeira posição do mercado imobiliário em praticamente todos os quesitos analisados: receita líquida, lucro, vendas, lançamentos e margens. O lucro líquido da PDG no segundo trimestre foi de R$ 221 milhões, um aumento de 179% sobre os números pró-forma das duas companhias no mesmo período de 2009. A Cyrela lucrou R$ 167 milhões de abril a junho.

A receita líquida da nova companhia foi de R$ 1,32 bilhão, 49% acima do segundo trimestre do ano passado. O lajida (lucro antes dos juros, impostos, depreciação e amortização) somou R$ 372 milhões, com margem de 28%. A margem lajida da Cyrela foi de 18,5%.

A PDG, é fato, ficou maior em tamanho. Mas também aumentou consideravelmente a sua dívida -principal herança negativa de Agre. A dívida líquida da PDG, que, sozinha, era de R$ 697 milhões ao final do primeiro trimestre, subiu para R$ 2,59 bilhões. A relação dívida líquida sobre patrimônio líquido, que foi de 27% na PDG no primeiro trimestre, passou para 46% no balanço consolidado.

Os benefícios do ganho de escala são visíveis no balanço, mas a PDG Realty se apressou para renegociar e melhorar o perfil da dívida de Agre para não comprometer seus resultados por um prazo longo. O bom relacionamento com os bancos permitiu à companhia que concluísse o processo de renegociação do endividamento da Agre. A dívida de capital de giro da Agre foi reduzida de R$ 1,3 bilhão para R$ 1 bilhão e houve um alongamento do prazo médio de 29 meses para 48 meses.

A parcela de dívida de capital de giro, que tinha um custo elevado (CDI mais 3%) foi alongada e substituída por linhas com custo médio na casa de CDI mais 2%, em linha com o custo pago pela PDG. “Fragmentamos a dívida em vários bancos, principalmente Itaú, Bradesco, HSBC e Banco do Brasil”, explica Michel Wurman, diretor financeiro e de relações com investidores da PDG.

Com dificuldade de acesso ao crédito, a Agre tocava boa parte das obras com recursos próprios. A PDG contratou R$ 1 bilhão em novos contratos do Sistema Financeiro de Habitação (SFH), dívida mais barata e considerada “saudável” pelo setor, dos quais R$ 150 milhões liberados imediatamente. A PDG também está securitizando os recebíveis que a Agre tinha em carteira: foram cerca de R$ 300 milhões de operações de securitização de recebíveis com emissão prevista para agosto e setembro. “O efeito líquido da renegociação na despesa financeira será de R$ 10 milhões por trimestre, num total de R$ 40 milhões”, diz Wurman.

Com a Agre – empresa que resultava da união de Agra, Abyara e Klabin Segall – a margem líquida de PDG, que vinha na casa dos 20%, caiu para 17% no segundo trimestre – abaixo da MRV, em linha com a Rossi e acima da Cyrela e Gafisa – para comparar com as grandes. “Não vamos voltar para os 20% ainda este ano, mas fechamos a renegociação das dívidas e estamos acelerando os ganhos de escala para voltar aos níveis anteriores”, afirma Zeca Grabowsky, presidente da PDG Realty.

A PDG cortou perto de 15% da folha da Agre, cerca de 35 pessoas de salários mais altos e fechou escritórios do Rio e do Sul, em função da totalização da compra da LN, empresa com forte atuação no Paraná. A PDG, que já era dona de 80%, comprou 100% da LN.

A nova empresa teve aumento de 27,7% nas despesas de vendas e administrativas, que passaram para R$ 297,2 milhões de janeiro a junho deste ano. Quando se compara com a receita líquida, porém, há uma queda -a soma dos gastos totais sobre a receita líquida recuou de 14,7% para 11,8% no semestre.

O aumento do INCC – de 5,9% no ano – não afetou os resultados da companhia, mas o presidente da PDG reconhece que é um problema, sobretudo em São Paulo e no Rio. “Na média e alta renda, o mercado absorve aumento de preço e na baixa estamos usando métodos construtivos que reduzem custo, como os pré-moldados.”

%d blogueiros gostam disto: